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Membership

The NAFWS has Individual and Tribal memberships

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP

 We are glad you want to become an Individual member.  Many of our members include tribal natural resource managers, tribal environmental professionals, tribal technicians, tribal conservation law officers, government professionals, non-government  individuals, state and private individuals, tribal elders and youth, and organizations, families. As a member, we share with you information on legislative, bio-technical, economic, legal, fiscal, and enforcement programs to help form a progressive agenda of tribal management pursuits.

As a member, you will receive the following:

  •  Quarterly newsletters, with news and information relating to Native American tribal natural resources.
  • Email news and updates

MEMBERSHIP

  • One year -  Individual - $20 
  • Student - $12.50

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Download a membership form here.

You can also send a donation to NAFWS. Please download the Donation Form here. Or alternatively you can send a donation via Paypal.

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TRIBAL MEMBERSHIP

Federally recognized tribes in the U.S. seeking membership, should provide a tribal resolution support and submit to the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society, 8515 Pearl St., Suite #203, Thornton, CO 80229, or call, 866-890-7258.

Please see a list of our Member Tribes here.

CONFERENCE DONATIONS

The Society holds an annual conference that brings together fish and wildlife managers, technicians, conservation law enforcement officers, biologists and others who are dedicated to preserving and enhancing tribal natural resources.   The Society needs donations to offset the cost of these highly productive conferences.  The following link, Purpose of Donations, provides additional information for prospective donors.

 

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Regions

 

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The NAFWS Board of Directors represent seven regions, two board directors serve each region.

ALASKA REGION
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St. Mary's, AK

Robert Aloysius
Kalskag, AK

PACIFIC REGION
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Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

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Patrol Supervisor
Columbia River InterTribal Fish Enforcement

SOUTHWEST REGION
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., NAFWS Sec/Treas.
Walker River Paiute Tribe

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Hopi Tribe Wildlife and Ecosystems Management Department
Kykotsmovi, AZ

GREAT PLAINS REGION
Charles Wilkinson
Three Affiliated Tribes


Jeff Kelly

Standing Rock, Ft. Yates

GREAT LAKES REGION
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., NAFWS President
Fish & Wildlife Coordinator/Biologist,
Menominee Tribe Natural Resources

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Chief Game Warden
Grand Traverse Band of Odawa & Chippewa Tribes

NORTHEAST REGION
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Narragansett Tribe

*Vacant

SOUTHEAST REGION
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., NAFWS Vice-President
Department of Natural Resources
Eastern Band of Cherokee Tribe

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Choctaw Wildlife and Parks Department

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Purpose & Mission

Our Mission

As a non-profit organization, the Society's mission is to assist Native American and Alaska Native Tribes with the conservation, protection, and enhancement of their fish and wildlife resources.
As a 501(c)(3) public charitable non-profit Colorado corporation, all contributions are tax-deductible in accordance with IRS regulations.

Our Purpose

The Society's purposes are charitable, educational, scientific and cultural, as well as the following:

  • To assist in the facilitation and coordination of inter-tribal communication in regards to fish and wildlife matters, including issues with treaty rights, court cases related to fish and wildlife, and hunting and fishing regulations.
  • To protect, preserve and conserve the wise use and management of tribal fish, wildlife, and recreation resources.
  • To educate Native Americans involved in fish and wildlife management, policy decision makers, community members and others similarly dedicated to tribal natural resource management, of the best management practices.
  • To provide administrative support, expertise and advice to tribal governments, relating to tribal fish, wildlife and recreation resources.
  • To improve the general welfare of tribal people through educational, charitable, as well as fish and wildlife enhancement activities.
  • To provide professional publications and promotional activities for disseminating information about Native American fish and wildlife resources to members, organizations, public officials, and the general public.

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Background

The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society (NAFWS) is a national tribal organization established informally during the early 1980's. NAFWS was incorporated in 1983 to develop a national communications network for the exchange of information and management techniques related to self-determined tribal fish and wildlife management.

Land Base

Federally-recognized Indian tribes within the lower 48 United States have jurisdiction over a reservation land base of more than 52 million acres, or 81,250 square miles. Alaskan Native lands comprise another 45 million acres. Some tribes control resources outside of reservations due to federal court decisions and voluntary cooperative agreements which allow a co-management status between tribes and states. These lands are called Ceded and Usual and Accustomed Areas and equal over 38 million acres. In these areas, tribes maintain co-management jurisdiction for fisheries and wildlife management and utilization. Thus, tribal lands coupled with the Ceded and Usual and Accustomed Areas total a natural resource base of over 140,625 square miles, containing more than 730,000 acres of lakes and impoundments, and over 10,000 miles of streams and rivers. This land combined would constitute the fifth largest state in the United States.


To Native Americans this land provides a cultural, religious, and economic subsistence base. This substantial resource base is also being utilized by both Indians and non-Indians for outdoor recreation purposes. These areas constitute an additional wilderness resource for the country. They contain habitat which is critical to the recovery of a number of species that are listed as threatened or endangered, from fish and birds to big game.

Asserting Their Rights

Tribes are being recognized as prominent fisheries and wildlife managers as they assert their treaty rights concerning management of their fish and wildlife resources.
Tribes may want to ensure that the environmental quality of their life and that of the fish and wildlife are not threatened. As demand for fisheries and wildlife recreational facilities grows, so does the pressure upon tribal resources. Today, Indian reservations contribute significantly toward meeting the national demand for fishing and hunting opportunities. Unfortunately, the funding options open to tribes have not kept pace with the expanding cost for management and authority of these fish and wildlife resources.

Preserving Our Precious Resouces

Ensuring the vast resource base are kept in tact for future generations, the NAFWS aims to support tribal decision-makers towards astute natural resource management.  Native Americans continually demonstrate environmental sensitivity towards the earth's precious resources and are looked to by many to 'show the way' to replenish the earth's resources. In today's changing world, however, tribes are faced with a complexity of situations demanding a marriage of traditional management practices with the cutting-edge of biological management. This task places enormous strain on those in leadership and management roles. These leaders are charged not only with the maintenance of diminishing resources, but with the responsibility of shaping resource management into a flexible entity sensitive to the needs and concerns of Native Americans. To this end, the Society strives to provide assistance to tribes and tribal leadership, and support them in their self-determined march towards a secure natural resource future.

 

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